More Employment Coverage

  • February 23, 2024

    Top NC Labor Brass Face Retooled 'Incentive' Policy Suit

    A corrosion control company has retooled its claims that North Carolina labor officials incentivized inspectors to issue workplace safety citations, highlighting in a revised complaint the harm caused by the citations after its 2021 lawsuit was tossed last month for failing to make a stronger connection to its alleged injuries.

  • February 23, 2024

    The New BIPA? Attys Warn GIPA Is A 'Live Grenade'

    After notable appellate victories in biometric privacy cases, Illinois plaintiffs have seized upon a previously little-used law protecting workers' genetic privacy, leaving defense attorneys wondering if history will repeat itself and open companies to potentially explosive liability. 

  • February 23, 2024

    Nonprofit Fights To Keep Child Forced Labor Cocoa Suit Alive

    A nonprofit on Friday challenged U.S. Customs and Border Protection's bid to dismiss allegations the agency ignored a four-year petition to ban major chocolate companies from importing cocoa allegedly harvested by children, saying the delay harmed it by impairing its mission.

  • February 23, 2024

    Mich. Ex-Judge Disbarred For Sending Explicit Texts To Client

    A former Michigan state chief judge was disbarred after he sent sexually explicit text messages to a client, encouraged that client to drink while they were on probation, and practiced while his license was suspended following a drunk driving plea.

  • February 23, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs DOL's Black Lung Benefits Award For Miner

    The Sixth Circuit stood by an administrative law judge's ruling that a former coal miner is entitled to black lung benefits even if his long history of smoking might have also contributed to his pneumoconiosis, denying a petition for review from the man's former employer.

  • February 22, 2024

    Athletes' NCAA Suit Will Wait For JPML

    College athletes fighting for a slice of the broadcasting profits their games earn will have to wait until the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation decides whether to consolidate their case with another similar suit before they continue briefing, a Colorado federal judge has ruled.

  • February 22, 2024

    Coldwell Banker Wins Trade Secrets Fight On Directed Verdict

    A California state judge issued a directed verdict for Coldwell Banker's Orange County division in a case where a rival real estate company accused it of poaching employees and stealing trade secrets.

  • February 22, 2024

    DraftKings Says Ex-Exec's $310K Attys Fees Bid Is Excessive

    DraftKings has told a California federal court that the "whopping" $310,000 in attorney fees requested by a former executive after the company shuffled the case back and forth between state and federal court is an unreasonable fee no "reasonable client" would pay.

  • February 22, 2024

    Fla. Whistleblower Suit Deal Averts Littler's Disqualification

    Littler Mendelson PC won't have to face a disqualification bid in Florida federal court over a firm attorney's purported use of a mistakenly produced, privileged document at a deposition after its client reached a settlement in a whistleblower retaliation suit, court records show.

  • February 21, 2024

    ByteDance Can't Arbitrate Ex-Coder's Wrongful Firing Suit

    A California federal judge declined to send a former ByteDance Inc. engineer's wrongful termination suit to arbitration, writing in a ruling made public Tuesday that there are factual disputes over whether he signed employment agreements containing arbitration clauses, saying the matter should be resolved via a jury trial.

  • February 21, 2024

    PE Firm Can't Shake Ex-CEO's Retaliation Suit In NC

    A North Carolina federal judge has maintained the bulk of a former executive's suit accusing a private equity firm of duping him into accepting a top role at a defense supply unit and firing him when he refused to hide the company's financial reality from a major defense contractor client, reasoning that he satisfied pleading standards.

  • February 21, 2024

    Salesman Accused Of AI Misuse Must Hand Over Co. Docs

    A Connecticut salesman who allegedly used the artificial intelligence application Otter to record company calls must return any of his former employer's internal documents that are still in his possession and swear that he no longer has any of the material at issue in a trade secrets lawsuit, a federal judge has ruled.

  • February 21, 2024

    Drexel U Dodges Expanded 'Intentional Interference' Claims

    The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania ruled Wednesday that at-will employees can sue for intentional interference with their employment relationships under state law, but said a former Drexel University accountant who had brought the case before them fell short of showing her supervisor was acting as a third party under the new tort.

  • February 21, 2024

    Tully Rinckey's Employment Terms Violated Rules, Panel Says

    The founders of Tully Rinckey PLLC should be suspended for 90 days for placing improper employment restrictions on people who worked in the firm's Washington, D.C., office, an attorney ethics committee has recommended.

  • February 21, 2024

    Cochran Firm Rachets Up Fee Fight With Ex-Associate

    The Cochran Firm California is escalating its ongoing dispute over attorney fees with a former associate, alleging in a new lawsuit that the now-departed lawyer lied to a managing partner about her relationship with a client with a lucrative claim.

  • February 21, 2024

    Lewis Brisbois Adds 2 Professional Liability Pros In Portland

    Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP has hired two employment and professional liability attorneys previously with Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP as partners in its Portland, Oregon, office, the firm has announced.

  • February 21, 2024

    Wells Fargo Settles With Alleged Trade Secrets Poacher

    A Georgia federal court on Tuesday ended a recently settled lawsuit from Wells Fargo Bank against a former employee who was accused of stealing a trove of records from the bank on the eve of his departure for a competing payment processing company.

  • February 20, 2024

    Bank's Ex-Employees Must Face Trade Secrets Suit

    A Texas federal judge refused on Tuesday to toss the bulk of trade secret claims against a group of former employees of a company that eventually became Centennial Bank, but he did agree to trim some claims.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ex-OCC Fintech Chief Won Over Top Brass Despite Red Flags

    The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency's onetime fintech chief who seemingly fabricated his professional background appears to have sailed through the hiring process at the agency, according to internal OCC communications obtained by Law360.

  • February 20, 2024

    Insurer Must Pay Defense Costs In Newspaper Shooting Row

    An insurer owed coverage to the parent companies of a Maryland newspaper for the legal fees resulting from two underlying lawsuits brought by the victims and their families after a 2018 mass shooting, an Illinois federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    DraftKings Pushes To Keep Strict Limits On Former Exec

    Sports betting company DraftKings Inc. on Tuesday urged a Massachusetts federal court to maintain tight restrictions on a previous executive who is now working for Fanatics, bashing the man's attempts at loosening the court's order as "procedural sophistry" that will threaten its business.

  • February 20, 2024

    Biotech Co. SomaLogic, Former Exec Settle Fight Over Stock

    Colorado-based biotechnology company SomaLogic Inc. and a former co-founder of a company it purchased in 2022 have resolved a lawsuit over the executive's departure and the fate of 400,000 unvested shares, with a California federal judge dismissing the case for good on Friday.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fox Rothschild AI Chief Talks 'Terrifying' Deepfakes, Biased AI

    Mark McCreary, the chief artificial intelligence and information security officer at Fox Rothschild, leads his firm's internal AI strategy and provides counsel to other law firms trying to bushwhack their path through the often murky AI legal landscape, rife with hallucinated case law citations and disturbingly real deepfakes.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ex-Elections Chief Chose To Leave Job, NJ Gov. Says

    New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy has urged a New Jersey state court judge to toss allegations from the Garden State's former elections chief that his civil rights were violated when he was pushed to resign in retaliation for a satirical article, arguing that he never suffered any loss because he voluntarily retired.

  • February 20, 2024

    Insurers Say Pollution Exclusion Bars Cancer Suits Defense

    An oil company accused of causing four people to develop cancer through exposure to harmful chemicals should not have coverage for its defense of the claims, according to four Nationwide units that told an Illinois federal court the company has no pollution coverage.

Expert Analysis

  • Future Not Looking Bright For Calif. Employee Nonsolicits

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    California's new legislation imposing potentially harsh consequences on employers for attempting to enforce noncompetes raises questions about the fate of employee nonsolicitation agreements — and both federal and state court decisions suggest the days of the latter may be numbered, say Anthony Oncidi and Philippe Lebel at Proskauer.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Del. Ruling Stands Out In Thorny Noncompete Landscape

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    In Cantor Fitzgerald v. Ainslie, the Delaware Supreme Court last month upheld the enforceability of forfeiture-for-competition provisions in limited partnership agreements, providing a noteworthy opinion amid a time of increasing disfavor toward noncompetes and following a string of Chancery Court rulings deeming them unreasonable, say Margaret Butler and Steven Goldberg at BakerHostetler.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Reassessing Trade Secrets Amid Proposed Noncompete Ban

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    The Federal Trade Commission's proposed ban on noncompete agreements as well as state bans make it prudent for businesses to reevaluate and reinvigorate approaches to trade secret protection, including knowing what information employees are providing to vendors, and making sure confidentiality agreements are put in place before information is shared, says Rob Jensen at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

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    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • HR Antitrust Compliance Crucial Amid DOJ Scrutiny

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    The Justice Department's Antitrust Division recently announced a required human resources component for antitrust compliance programs, which means companies should evaluate their policies to prevent, detect and remediate potential violations as they add training for HR professionals, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Calif. Disclosure Update Adds To Employer Trial Prep Burden

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    Though California’s recently updated litigation disclosure procedures may streamline some aspects of employment suits filed in the state, plaintiffs' new ability to demand a wider range of information on a tighter timeline will burden companies with the need to invest more resources into investigating cases much earlier in the process, says Jeffrey Horton Thomas at Fox Rothschild.

  • Mass Arb. Rule Changes May Be A Hindrance For Consumers

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    The American Arbitration Association's recent changes to its mass arbitration supplementary rules and fee schedule, including a shift from filing fees to initiation and per-case fees, may reduce consumers' ability to counteract businesses' mandatory arbitration agreements, say Eduard Korsinsky and Alexander Krot at Levi & Korsinsky.

  • 3 Principles For Minimizing The Risk Of A Nuclear Verdict

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    In one of the latest examples of so-called nuclear verdicts, a single plaintiff was awarded $2.25 billion in a jury trial against Monsanto — revealing the need for defense attorneys to prioritize trust, connection and simplicity when communicating with modern juries, say Jenny Hergenrother and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.