Energy

  • February 23, 2024

    Russian Assets Seen As Key To Tipping The Scales For Ukraine

    The 500-plus sanctions the U.S. added against Russia and its enablers Friday will continue to make the Kremlin's war more costly, but experts say the key to a real sea change in Ukraine is giving it Russia's seized assets abroad.

  • February 23, 2024

    Smirnov's Attys May Be Trying To Help Him Flee, Judge Says

    A California federal judge indicated Thursday that counsel for Alexander Smirnov, the former FBI informant charged with fabricating reports that President Joe Biden and his son took bribes from a Ukrainian company, are trying to get Smirnov released ahead of trial "likely to facilitate his absconding from the United States."

  • February 23, 2024

    Judge Trims Bulk Of Investor Suit Against Oil, AI Companies

    A California federal judge retained only a small part of an investor suit against artificial intelligence company C3.ai and oil company Baker Hughes, cutting Baker Hughes entirely, and finding only some claims accusing C3.ai and its executives of misleading investors about its financial performance and partnership with the oil company could survive dismissal.

  • February 23, 2024

    Top NC Labor Brass Face Retooled 'Incentive' Policy Suit

    A corrosion control company has retooled its claims that North Carolina labor officials incentivized inspectors to issue workplace safety citations, highlighting in a revised complaint the harm caused by the citations after its 2021 lawsuit was tossed last month for failing to make a stronger connection to its alleged injuries.

  • February 23, 2024

    Wildlife, Paddling Groups Want To Join Clean Water Act Fight

    The National Wildlife Federation and American Whitewater are asking a Louisiana federal judge to let them join litigation over an updated Clean Water Act rule that expanded states' and tribes' ability to block projects such as pipelines and dams over water quality concerns, to ensure their interests are considered.

  • February 23, 2024

    Crypto Org, Bitcoin Miner Sue DOE Over Electricity Survey

    A Texas cryptocurrency industry association and a crypto-mining company have sued the U.S. Department of Energy in an attempt to block its plans to solicit mining companies' information about electricity consumption, alleging the department shirked the proper statutory process to collect the data.

  • February 23, 2024

    Oil Biz Gave Wells To Shell Co. To Skip Cleanup, Suit Says

    Oil and gas company HRM Resources has been accused in Colorado state court by landowners of fraudulently transferring roughly 200 oil and gas wells to a shell company that soon turned around and declared bankruptcy in order to dodge cleanup obligations.

  • February 23, 2024

    Conn. Justices OK $2.9M Cut To Power Co.'s Cost Recovery

    Connecticut's highest court on Friday held that state energy regulators properly trimmed a power company's annual cost recovery bid by more than $2.86 million, agreeing with a lower court that it was not arbitrary or capricious to decline to pass the expense to customers.

  • February 23, 2024

    1st Circ. Told Wind Farm's Approval Should've Been A Breeze

    A wind farm developer has asked the First Circuit to reject fishing groups' challenge to the U.S. Department of the Interior's approval of a proposed project off the coast of Martha's Vineyard, saying the effort to sink the plan can't survive because the agency did things by the book.

  • February 23, 2024

    NH Plant Strikes Deal On Power Purchase Contract

    A bankrupt New Hampshire power plant reached terms on a deal Friday with an entity whose contract to purchase the facility's power was rejected earlier this week, telling a Delaware federal judge the agreement will help quickly transition to a new purchaser and stave off a shutdown of the plant.

  • February 23, 2024

    Groups Back Texas' Bid To Void Feds' Highway GHG Rule

    Construction trade groups have thrown their support behind the state of Texas' federal lawsuit seeking to vacate a new U.S. Department of Transportation rule requiring states to set targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from federally funded highway projects.

  • February 23, 2024

    Ex-Vitol Oil Trader Convicted On FCPA Rap

    Former Vitol Oil Group trader Javier Aguilar was convicted Friday of Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and money laundering violations, after nearly two months of trial over claims that he bribed officials in Ecuador and Mexico in order to win $500 million in business deals for the global energy and commodities company.

  • February 23, 2024

    Texas Says EPA Unfairly Changed Ozone Plan Rules

    The state of Texas this week urged the Fifth Circuit to upend the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's denial of its revised plan to control ozone in the Dallas and Houston metropolitan areas, saying the agency rejected the plan based on standards put in place after it was submitted.

  • February 23, 2024

    Alaska Judge Won't Disturb Oil, Gas Lease Moratorium Order

    An Alaska federal judge rejected bids by the state's development authority to amend or vacate an order upholding a temporary moratorium the Biden administration imposed on an Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Coastal Plain oil and gas program, holding that the case isn't moot after the government canceled its leases.

  • February 23, 2024

    Ex-Metals Co. Exec Says He Was Denied Promised Bonuses

    A former vice president for finance and administration at a Pennsylvania metals company told a state court that he was promised yearly performance-based bonuses of about $20,000, but was thwarted by the company's lack of goals and its claim that it wasn't performing well enough even as other employees got bonuses.

  • February 23, 2024

    Woodside Selling 15.1% Stake In Aussie Gas Project For $1.4B

    Australia's Woodside Energy said Friday it will sell a 15.1% stake in its Scarborough gas project to Japan-based JERA at a $1.4 billion value, creating a partnership that will help boost the project's development while creating opportunities for further collaboration. 

  • February 23, 2024

    US Hits Russia With Largest Sanctions Since Ukraine Invasion

    The U.S. announced over 500 new sanctions on Russia Friday following the death of opposition leader Alexei Navalny, marking the largest number of sanctions since Moscow invaded Ukraine two years ago.

  • February 22, 2024

    10th Circ. Won't Enforce $2.3M Award In Shipping Feud

    The Tenth Circuit has shut down a shipowner's bid to enforce a $2.3 million arbitral award against a charterer's founder following a dispute over a stymied Venezuelan oil shipping deal, rejecting arguments that the shipowner could hold the founder liable as his company's alter ego.

  • February 22, 2024

    Ex-FBI Source Charged With Biden Bribery Lies Is Rearrested

    The former FBI informant charged with fabricating reports that President Joe Biden and his son took $10 million in bribes from a Ukrainian energy company was rearrested Thursday morning in Las Vegas, as prosecutors fight to undo his bail in the California federal criminal case.

  • February 22, 2024

    Ex-BP Exec's Husband Cops To $1.7M Insider Trading

    The husband of a former manager at British oil and gas company BP PLC on Thursday pled guilty to securities fraud in Texas federal court and agreed to forfeit the $1.7 million he made with the help of insider trading, the U.S. Department of Justice said Thursday.

  • February 22, 2024

    Ex-Vitol Trader Denies Knowing Of Bribes, As Trial Nears End

    Counsel for a former Vitol Group executive told a New York federal jury in closing arguments Thursday that his client wasn't aware of bribes being paid to officials in Ecuador and Mexico in order to obtain $500 million in state contracts, while a prosecutor insisted that the former oil trader was the linchpin to the corruption scheme.

  • February 22, 2024

    No Early Win For Geothermal Co. Founder In Ownership Row

    A Colorado federal judge Thursday declined to give a geothermal startup founder an early win in a bitter fight over ownership of the company, concluding in an order that there are too many disputes over a noncompete agreement for the case to be resolved through summary judgment.

  • February 22, 2024

    Feds Back Fed. Circ. Deference To Trump Solar Duty Change

    The Biden administration urged the full Federal Circuit not to rehear energy companies' challenge to modified safeguard duties on solar goods, disagreeing with the importers' contention that a panel gave former President Donald Trump too much deference when allowing the safeguards.

  • February 22, 2024

    Exxon Wants To Press Forward With Activist Investor Case

    ExxonMobil Corp. says it should be allowed to move forward with a lawsuit against a pair of activist investors who proposed that the company speed up the pace of its greenhouse gas emission reductions, arguing that the investors' decision to withdraw the proposal will not prevent a similar one from being filed in the future.

  • February 22, 2024

    NY Offshore Wind Project Gets Final Green Light From Feds

    The Biden administration said Thursday it has approved the Empire Wind offshore wind energy project's construction and operations plan, clearing the way for construction of two wind facilities off the coast of Long Island, New York.

Expert Analysis

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Why Biz Groups Disagree On Ending Chevron Deference

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    Two amicus briefs filed in advance of last month's U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments in Loper Bright Enterprises v. Raimondo highlight contrasting views on whether the doctrine of Chevron deference promotes or undermines the stable regulatory environment that businesses require, say Wyatt Kendall and Sydney Brogden at Morris Manning.

  • A Look Ahead For The Electric Vehicle Charging Industry

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    This will likely be an eventful year for the electric vehicle market as government efforts to accelerate their adoption inevitably clash with backlash from supporters of the petroleum industry, say Rue Phillips at SkillFusion and Enid Joffe at Green Paradigm Consulting.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Opinion

    Exxon Court Should Clarify Shareholder Proposal Exclusion

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    ExxonMobil last month took the unusual action of asking a Texas federal judge whether a proposal from climate activists seeking to limit oil and gas sales could be excluded from its 2024 proxy statement, and the court should use this opportunity to reevaluate SEC policy and set clear limits on when shareholder proposals can be included, says Stephen Bainbridge at UCLA School of Law.

  • Challenges Remain In Financing Energy Transition Minerals

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    COP28, the latest U.N. climate conference, reached a consensus on a just and equitable transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy, but more action and funding will be needed to ensure that developed countries responsibly source the minerals that will be critical for this process, say attorneys at Watson Farley.

  • Exxon ESG Proxy Statement Suit May Chill Investor Proposals

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    Exxon Mobil’s recent use of a Texas federal lawsuit to intimidate shareholders into withdrawing a climate-friendly proxy proposal could inspire more public companies to sue to avoid adopting ESG resolutions — a power move that would chill activist investor participation and unbalance shareholder-corporate relations, say Domenico Minerva and James Fee at Labaton Keller.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • What To Know About RWI In Acquisition And Divestiture Deals

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    As a slower pace of merger activity turns underwriters toward new industries, representations and warranties insurance policies are increasingly being written for acquisition and divestiture energy deals, making it important for contracting parties to understand how the RWI underwriting process works in this new sector, say attorneys at Haynes Boone.

  • Opinion

    New La. Gas Pipeline Projects Must Respect Rules And Rights

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    As pipeline developers rush to join in Louisiana's Haynesville Shale gas boom, established operators like Energy Transfer are justified in demanding that newer entrants respect safety rules, regulatory requirements and property rights when proposing routes that would cross existing pipelines, says Joshua Campbell at Campbell Law.

  • Freight Forwarders And Common Carriers: Know Your Cargo

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    Freight forwarders and other nonprincipal parties involved in global cargo movement should follow the guidance in the multi-agency know-your-cargo compliance note to avoid enforcement actions should they fail to spot evasive tactics used in supply chains to circumvent U.S. sanctions and export controls, say attorneys at Venable.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • The Latest Antitrust Areas For In-House Counsel To Watch

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    The U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission's increasingly aggressive approach to antitrust enforcement means in-house counsel should closely monitor five key compliance issues, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • Del.'s Tesla Pay Takedown Tells Boards What Not To Do

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    The Delaware Chancery Court’s ruthless dissection of the Tesla board’s extreme departures from standard corporate governance in its January opinion striking down CEO Elon Musk’s $55 billion pay package offers a blow-by-blow guide to mistakes Delaware public companies can avoid when negotiating executive compensation, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • The Corporate Disclosure Tug-Of-War's Free Speech Issues

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    The continuing conflict over corporate disclosure requirements — highlighted by a lawsuit against Missouri's anti-ESG rules — has important implications not just for investors and regulated entities but also for broader questions about the scope of the First Amendment, say Colin Pohlman, and Jane Luxton and Paul Kisslinger at Lewis Brisbois.

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