Policy & Compliance

  • May 10, 2024

    Texas Justices Limit Damages In Unwanted Pregnancy Case

    The Texas Supreme Court said Friday that a woman who sued her doctor for failing to perform a sterilization procedure can't collect damages for emotional and physical pain in connection with her wrongful pregnancy claim, holding that the birth of a healthy child isn't a compensable injury but "a life with inherent dignity and profound, immeasurable value."

  • May 10, 2024

    What To Know About Biden's ACA Nondiscrimination Rule

    Recently finalized regulations tackling what constitutes discrimination under the Affordable Care Act could have significant impacts on health plans that include greater liability for third-party plan administrators, attorneys say. Here are three things employers should know now that the final rule is on the books.

  • May 09, 2024

    Judge Clarifies Gilead Didn't Directly Infringe HIV Drug IP

    A Delaware federal judge on Thursday rejected Gilead Sciences' request to amend her judgment finding that two medications in its HIV prevention regimen, Truvada and Descovy, directly infringed the government's invalidated patents, but clarified her judgment to say that non-party patients or physicians committed the infringement.

  • May 09, 2024

    Doc Can't Escape Second Prednisone Overprescribing Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge won't strike claims for punitive damages and references to "outrageous" conduct from a complaint alleging that a doctor wrongly overprescribed medications including prednisone, saying the complaint plausibly alleged that he knowingly had a patient on a medication plan that harmed her.

  • May 09, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Judge Defied Order To Revive Opioid Case

    The Ninth Circuit on Thursday again revived a nearly 7-year-old case against a California doctor for allegedly selling opioid prescriptions and ordered that the case be reassigned, saying the presiding judge had defied the plain language of a previous order to reinstate the indictment.

  • May 09, 2024

    DOJ Task Force To Target Healthcare Monopoly, Collusion

    The U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division sharpened its focus Thursday on healthcare platforms that combine doctors with insurers, data and more in what the administration's top competition official called the "alarming" accumulation of assets.

  • May 09, 2024

    La. Lawmakers OK Local Tax Break For Certain Eye Meds

    Louisiana would expand a local sales tax exemption to include prescriptions used to treat eye-related conditions under a bill that was unanimously passed by the state Senate and next goes to the governor.

  • May 09, 2024

    Ex-Celtic 'Big Baby' Gets 40 Mos. In Health Fraud Case

    Former Boston Celtics forward Glen "Big Baby" Davis was sentenced to 40 months in prison Thursday after being convicted for his role in a scheme to submit fraudulent invoices to an NBA healthcare plan.

  • May 08, 2024

    GW Hospital Bargained In Bad Faith, NLRB Dems Say In Redo

    A split National Labor Relations Board panel said Wednesday that George Washington University Hospital sabotaged union negotiations with unworkable proposals, reasserting precedent that employers bargain in bad faith by insisting on contract provisions that effectively nullify unions.

  • May 07, 2024

    MultiPlan, Insurance Cos. Accused Of Algorithmic Collusion

    A medical provider has lodged a proposed class action in Illinois federal court accusing MultiPlan and major insurance companies, including UnitedHealth, Aetna, Kaiser Permanente and Cigna, of using pricing tools to systematically underpay out-of-network providers.

  • May 07, 2024

    Why Midwives Are Fighting Practice Limits Across The US

    Heather Swanson has long hoped to use her training to help pregnant people in Nebraska give birth safely in their homes but is blocked by state law. Today, she’s among a number of midwives battling laws they say unduly restrict skilled healthcare providers while maternity care "deserts” proliferate across the U.S.

  • May 07, 2024

    Rare Texas Discovery Rule Deployed In Abortion Travel Case

    A Lone Star State lawyer pursuing documents and depositions about an out-of-state abortion is relying on a quirk of Texas civil procedure allowing for pre-litigation discovery. The Arnold & Porter attorney representing the targets calls the move "a shot across the bow" meant to discourage women from exercising their rights.

  • May 07, 2024

    Wary Of 'Pharmacy Deserts,' Oregon Agency Eyes Grocer Deal

    A new Oregon board focused on healthcare consolidation has the power to shape a divisive mega-deal between the Kroger and Albertsons grocery chains some fear would create "pharmacy deserts." Some experts think it could further entangle an agreement between chains that together fill a third of all prescriptions in the state.

  • May 07, 2024

    20 Years Ago, One Case Opened Up Billions In FCA Liability

    On the 20-year anniversary of a landmark whistleblower case, attorneys look back on how Franklin v. Parke-Davis shaped the healthcare landscape, put Boston on the map as a hotbed of False Claims Act litigation and changed the drug industry's off-label marketing practices.

  • May 07, 2024

    DOJ Inks FCA, Opioid-Branding Enforcement Settlements

    The U.S. Department of Justice has been busy over the past week settling a variety of False Claims Act claims as well as a case against a pharmaceutical company for allegedly violating the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act with deceptive opioid marketing.

  • May 07, 2024

    9th Circ. Asks Idaho To Define 'Recruit' In Abortion Travel Ban

    A Ninth Circuit panel grappled Tuesday with an Idaho law that makes it a criminal offense to help minors travel out of state to receive abortions without parental permission, with one judge struggling to understand what it means to "recruit" a pregnant teen to get an abortion under the law.

  • May 07, 2024

    Gov't Seeks Early Win In Ga. Medicaid Expansion Suit

    The Biden administration is urging a federal judge to take its side in a lawsuit in which Georgia is attempting to keep its Medicaid program for low-income residents running until 2028, arguing that the state never properly asked for a program extension and that the court lacks jurisdiction to extend its end date.

  • May 06, 2024

    Judge Trims ESOP Valuation Suit Against Healthcare Co.

    A California federal judge has trimmed a lawsuit against KPC Healthcare Inc., its employee stock ownership plan committee and its investment manager Alerus Financial alleging that a sale of company stock was mismanaged.

  • May 06, 2024

    UChicago Can't Ditch Data Sharing Privacy Claim

    A University of Chicago Medical Center patient accusing the hospital of illegally sharing her and other patients' identifying information with Meta can pursue her claims that the info sharing constitutes a federal wiretap violation, an Illinois federal judge said.

  • May 06, 2024

    Hooper Lundy Adds Government Relations Director

    An attorney who worked in-house for healthcare industry trade and advocacy associations has joined healthcare boutique Hooper Lundy & Bookman PC as director of government relations and public policy.

  • May 03, 2024

    Ala. High Court Won't Rethink Decision On Frozen Embryos

    The Alabama Supreme Court on Friday refused to revisit its February decision finding that frozen embryos count as children, a first-of-its-kind decision that has been received as potentially ruinous for in vitro fertilization services in the Yellowhammer State.

  • May 03, 2024

    Aetna To Pay $2M To End LGBTQ Fertility Coverage Suit

    A group of Aetna policyholders said Friday that the insurance giant has agreed to pay $2 million and revise certain health insurance guidelines to settle a proposed class action alleging its definition of infertility made it difficult and expensive for LGBTQ couples to obtain coverage for fertility treatments.

  • May 03, 2024

    Ohio Statehouse Catch-Up: Trans, Abortion Laws Face Battles

    Ohio lawmakers have shepherded controversial bills impacting healthcare, social media and other matters into law in recent months, prompting lawsuits and even a veto from Gov. Mike DeWine.

  • May 03, 2024

    6 States Strike $270M Opioid Deal With Amneal

    The New York state attorney general on Friday said that a $270 million multistate deal had been reached with opioid manufacturer Amneal Pharmaceuticals for its role in the addiction epidemic over allegations that the company failed to report suspicious orders of the narcotics.

  • May 02, 2024

    7th Circ. Mostly Backs Ill. Home Health Kickbacks Judgment

    The Seventh Circuit on Thursday largely left intact an Illinois federal judge's $6 million ruling that a home health care company broke federal kickback laws, refusing to reverse the lower court's liability finding but directing it to ensure its damages award was calculated correctly.

Expert Analysis

  • Health Policy Legislative Landscape May Remain Frozen

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    With Congress again delaying the full resolution of fiscal year 2024 federal spending legislation, there is now an additional window in which Congress could work through several priority issues for healthcare stakeholders, though these issues are unlikely to be resolved in time, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • Despite HHS Opinion, Gift Card Giveaways Require Caution

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    Though the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Inspector General recently determined that a healthcare consulting firm's gift card plans do not violate the Anti-Kickback Statute, the opinion does not suggest blanket approval for providing gift cards in exchange for referrals, say Ragini Acharya and Matthew Deutsch at Husch Blackwell.

  • DOJ's Biopharma Settlement Raises Anti-Kickback Questions

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    In the aftermath of the U.S. Department of Justice's settlement with Ultragenyx over genetic testing programs, it may be prudent to reevaluate genetic tests through the lens of the Anti-Kickback Statute and reconsider whether it is proper for free testing programs to be treated like patient assistance programs, says Mary Kohler at Kohler Health Law.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Bracing For Calif.'s New Health Transaction Framework

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    As California's new cost and market impact review regulations' April 1 date for its updated notice and review process approaches, healthcare entities should ready themselves for dramatic changes to the state's regulatory landscape and prepare for potentially substantial transaction delays, say Jordan Grushkin and Matthew Goldman at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Uncharted Waters Ahead For FCA Litigation In 2024

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    Following a year of significant court decisions, settlements, recoveries and proposed amendments, 2024 promises to be a lively year for False Claims Act actions and litigation, and one that will hopefully provide more clarity as FCA jurisprudence evolves, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • OIG Report Has Clues For 2024 Healthcare Fraud Enforcement

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    A recent report from the Health Department's Office of the Inspector General reveals healthcare fraud and abuse enforcement trends that will continue in 2024, from increased telehealth oversight to enhanced policing of managed care, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • FOIA Exemption Questions On Redacted HHS Cannabis Letter

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    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' recent recommendation letter concerning the rescheduling of cannabis was heavily redacted, and based on an analysis on the applicability of Freedom of Information Act Exemption 5 to the letter, it's likely that we will see successful legal challenges to those redactions, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • A Primer On New Calif. Health Transaction Reporting Rules

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    New California regulations regarding the reporting of certain transactions involving healthcare entities, which took effect on Jan. 1, address some industry feedback about overly broad requirements but still leave several areas of concern, says Andrew Demetriou at Husch Blackwell.

  • In The CFPB Playbook: Rulemaking Rush Before Election Year

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    In this quarterly Consumer Financial Protection Bureau activity recap by former bureau personnel, attorneys at McGuireWoods explain the regulator's recent push to finalize new rules about data aggregators, digital payment apps and more before the election-year Congressional Review Act window opens.

  • What The Law Firm Of The Future Will Look Like

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    As the legal landscape shifts, it’s become increasingly clear that the BigLaw business model must adapt in four key ways to remain viable, from fostering workplace flexibility to embracing technology, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • 4 PR Pointers When Your Case Is In The News

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    Media coverage of new lawsuits exploded last year, demonstrating why defense attorneys should devise a public relations plan that complements their legal strategy, incorporating several objectives to balance ethical obligations and advocacy, say Nathan Burchfiel at Pinkston and Ryan June at Castañeda + Heidelman.

  • Digging Into The Debate On FDA's Proposed Lab Test Rule

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    A proposed 10-word amendment from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration represents a sea change in device regulation as it would summarily end decades of FDA enforcement discretion for laboratory developed tests, and the public comments offer some insight into the future of this long-running saga, say attorneys at Mintz.