Immigration

  • February 23, 2024

    Over 150 Orgs Warn Biden Asylum Ban Would 'Stain' Legacy

    More than 150 organizations warned President Joe Biden that his administration was embracing policies that mirror those of former President Donald Trump, citing what they said has been a shift to cruel immigration policies from when Biden first took office.

  • February 23, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Asylum Rightly Denied Over UK Assault Record

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday ruled that a noncitizen was ineligible for asylum, finding reliable the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's evidence that he had sexually assaulted minors while living in the United Kingdom.

  • February 23, 2024

    ABA Report Says Electronic Monitoring Of Migrants Is Punitive

    The electronic monitoring of noncitizens by immigration authorities amounts to a form of detention that imposes a "considerable human toll" on immigrants and their families and may even violate constitutional guarantees of due process, according to a report commissioned by the American Bar Association that was released Friday.

  • February 23, 2024

    Feds Back ICE Contractor In 9th Circ. Detainee Wage Fight

    The federal government told the Ninth Circuit that immigrant detainees at contractor-run facilities aren't covered by state labor laws, backing GEO Group Inc.'s effort to overturn $23.2 million in judgments that found a detainee work program violated Washington's minimum wage law.

  • February 23, 2024

    Post-Conviction Relief Can't Save Immigrant From Removal

    A Kansas state court order vacating an immigrant's theft convictions was found insufficient to undo a deportation order, with the Board of Immigration Appeals saying Friday that the Kansas court hadn't provided a reason for walking back the convictions.

  • February 22, 2024

    Texas Developer Battles DOJ's 1st Predatory Mortgages Suit

    A Texas land developer is fighting back against a high-profile predatory lending lawsuit filed by the U.S. Department of Justice and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, telling a Houston federal judge that the government's "reverse redlining" theory isn't legally sound and relies on sloppy loan comparisons.

  • February 22, 2024

    Feds Can't Keep Depositions In Family Separation Suit Private

    A California federal judge ruled Thursday that the U.S. government can't keep deposition transcripts private in a lawsuit by families separated at the border during the Trump administration, saying no harm would come from making them public.

  • February 22, 2024

    Judge Irked By Arbitration Ask Years Into Au Pair Wage Case

    A Massachusetts federal judge on Thursday twice lobbed the phrase "judge shopping" at lawyers for an au pair placement agency that, four years into a proposed collective wage action by former child care workers, now want the case sent to arbitration in Switzerland.

  • February 22, 2024

    SD Winery Gets New Go At Hiring Foreign Kitchen Staff

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board on Wednesday revived a South Dakota winery's quest to temporarily hire foreign kitchen staff for its tourist season, faulting a certifying officer for giving the winery only one way to fix a hiring date discrepancy.

  • February 22, 2024

    NY Judge Halts State Ag Law's Anti-Union Speech Restriction

    A New York federal judge paused enforcement of a section of a state agricultural labor law that would make it an unfair labor practice to discourage unionization, saying claims from a farming group that the provision violates the First Amendment have a chance of success.

  • February 22, 2024

    ICE's Immunity Bars Bulk Of Virus Death Suit, For Now

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has for now dodged most of a lawsuit over the death of a man who contracted COVID-19 in detention, after a California federal court ruled that sovereign immunity barred most of the case.

  • February 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Judge Slams DOJ 'About-Face' In Asylum Rule Case

    A split Ninth Circuit panel agreed Wednesday to pause the Biden administration's appeal of a lower court order vacating a rule limiting asylum, as a dissenting judge excoriated the government for trying to settle the case after forcefully defending the rule.

  • February 21, 2024

    4th Circ. Tosses Migrant Bond Co.'s CFPB Funding Challenge

    The Fourth Circuit on Wednesday dismissed an appeal from an immigrant bond service company being sued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau for allegedly running a predatory scheme, finding that the court has no appellate jurisdiction over the litigation.

  • February 21, 2024

    Dubious Of Peak Season Claims, Judge Nixes Lodge's H-2B App

    A U.S. Department of Labor judge has rejected a South Dakota hunting lodge's efforts to hire six seasonal housekeepers for hunting season, saying the work hours logged in its payroll reports undermine claims of a "crushing" need during the early part of the season.

  • February 21, 2024

    Residential Developer Loses Bid For Temp Foreign Pipelayers

    A residential real estate developer can't temporarily hire 20 foreign pipelayers to work on five new projects after a U.S. Department of Labor appeals board ruled that the developer failed to show a certifying officer that the jobs were seasonal.

  • February 21, 2024

    Texas Seeks Nonprofit Shutdown, Alleges Migrant Smuggling

    Texas' attorney general wants a court in El Paso County to shut down a Catholic nonprofit organization for allegedly denying the state immediate access to records to evaluate whether the organization was smuggling or harboring migrants, among other alleged legal violations.

  • February 20, 2024

    Liberal Justices Hint Chevron Deference Hanging By A Thread

    In the U.S. Supreme Court's latest battle royal over administrative powers, left-leaning justices at oral arguments Tuesday openly suggested that the landmark legal doctrine underpinning modern rulemaking might soon shrivel up, clearing the way for industry-led challenges to regulations on the books for decades.

  • February 20, 2024

    Farms Say Workers Haven't Tied Them To Abusive Tactics

    Two agricultural companies look to escape claims that they trafficked a group of migrant workers, telling a Michigan federal court that the workers hadn't shown how they could have known that a recruiter used abusive tactics to obtain their labor.

  • February 20, 2024

    Developers Deny 'Shell Game' Amid Push For More Sanctions

    Real estate developers facing potential imprisonment over their failure to pay EB-5 investors at least $26 million in settlement and sanction judgments have told an Illinois federal court their money is not hidden in a "shell game" but rather tied up in receivership proceedings the investors already know about.

  • February 20, 2024

    Restoration Architect Says Visa Denial Ignored Evidence

    A Colombian restoration architect who wants to address the affordable housing shortage in the U.S., accused immigration officials in Florida federal court of disregarding more than 1,000 pages of evidence in denying him a national interest waiver for a visa.

  • February 20, 2024

    Permanent Need Dooms Request For H-2B Home Health Aides

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board has upheld the rejection of a business's request to hire four home health aides under the H-2B temporary foreign worker program, determining a certifying officer did not act arbitrarily and capriciously in finding the company failed to show its need for workers was temporary.

  • February 20, 2024

    Lack Of Evidence Kills Biz Group's Bid To Hire Foreign Janitors

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board shot down a Las Vegas-based Hispanic business group's bid to hire 100 foreign janitors to work during its event season, saying the group failed to hand over evidence to back its seasonal need.

  • February 20, 2024

    GOP Sens. Seek Full Impeachment Trial For Mayorkas

    A group of Senate Republicans made the case on Tuesday that their constitutional duty compels them to hold a full impeachment trial for Alejandro Mayorkas, secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, despite reservations from other Republicans in the Democrat-led Senate.

  • February 16, 2024

    Texas County Says State's Migrant Arrest Law Will Raise Costs

    Texas' Harris County urged a federal court to grant the Biden administration's bid to block an impending state law that would allow Texas to arrest and deport migrants, saying the law, if enforced, would lead to increased jail-related costs.

  • February 16, 2024

    DOL Faulted For Not Explaining Ala. Sonic's H-2B Visa Denial

    A U.S. Department of Labor appeals board has given the operator of an Alabama Sonic Drive-In another chance at temporarily hiring foreign cooks to help out in warm months, ruling that a certifying officer denied an application for the H-2B visa program without a satisfactory explanation.

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Expert Analysis

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • USCIS Fee Increases May Have Unintended Consequences

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    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ new fee schedule, intended to provide the agency with needed funds while minimizing the impact of higher fees on individual immigrants and their families, shifts too much of the burden onto employers, say Juan Steevens and William Coffman at Mintz.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

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