International Trade

  • April 08, 2024

    Greek Air Force Says $22M Contract Dispute Was Timely

    Greece's Air Force has urged the Federal Circuit to revive its $21.7 million suit over faulty cameras purchased from a U.S. contractor, saying its claim accumulated later than the U.S. government had argued and was timely.

  • April 08, 2024

    Menendez Seeks To Block Info On Lifestyle, Political Donors

    U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez is seeking to have evidence about his and his wife's lifestyle and spending habits and information about his campaign donors excluded from the bribery trial that the couple and two business associates are facing on May 6, according to court documents.

  • April 08, 2024

    EU Tax Single Filing Would Aid Small-Biz Trade, Official Says

    A proposal allowing small businesses in the European Union to file a single tax return with the administration of the business' head office as opposed to with every member country where the entity does business would cut compliance costs and encourage trade, an EU official said.

  • April 05, 2024

    Baltimore Bridge: Biden's Visit, Recovery, Supply Chain

    Nearly two weeks after the Francis Scott Key Bridge's collapse, government and legal maneuvers are taking shape as the Biden administration pledged to fully reopen the Port of Baltimore before June, while the owner and operator of the ship that caused the collapse sought to limit its financial liability.

  • April 05, 2024

    Trade Court Backs Commerce's Dates For Turkish Rebar Sales

    The U.S. Court of International Trade rebuffed Turkish rebar producers seeking to unwind tariffs on their products based on the U.S. Department of Commerce's designated date of sale for their U.S. imports, holding that evidence backed the agency.

  • April 05, 2024

    Judge Lourie's Dissent Revives Debate Over FDA Safe Harbor

    U.S. Circuit Judge Alan Lourie has urged the Federal Circuit to reconsider its precedent over a safe harbor that allows infringement when companies are developing products regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and many attorneys agreed with him that the appeals court has been improperly expanding the safe harbor for decades.

  • April 05, 2024

    Judge Newman Pushes To Keep Suit Over Suspension Intact

    U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman urged a D.C. federal judge Friday to let her pursue a constitutional challenge to the law under which she has been suspended, and to reject her colleagues' contention that her case does not pass legal muster.

  • April 05, 2024

    Gunmakers Denied Stay In Mexico Lawsuit

    Gunmakers hoping to get the U.S. Supreme Court to take up their effort to end a lawsuit by the Mexican government seeking to hold them liable for arming drug cartels can't make an end run around the First Circuit to pause the case while they wait, a Massachusetts district judge said on Friday.

  • April 05, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Upholds Australian Steel Import Pricing

    A Federal Circuit panel has backed the U.S. Department of Commerce and a trade court's assessment of the prices an Australian steel company charged its U.S. customer, holding that the companies provided enough of a paper trail to explain their relationship.

  • April 05, 2024

    Fla. Men Admit To Illegally Sending Aircraft Parts To Russia

    Two Florida residents pled guilty this week in Arizona to conspiracy to violate the Export Control Reform Act by illegally exporting controlled aviation technology to Russia.

  • April 05, 2024

    5th Circ. Won't Touch Texas Oil Export Terminal License

    The Fifth Circuit has rejected environmentalists' attempt to undo federal approval for a deepwater oil export terminal off Texas' Gulf Coast, finding the U.S. Coast Guard adequately considered the environmental consequences of the facility in its environmental assessment.

  • April 05, 2024

    Justices Urged To Mull Hezbollah-Tied Bank's Immunity 'Now'

    U.S. victims of terrorist attacks in Iraq warned the U.S. Supreme Court that forgoing review on whether a defunct Lebanese bank can claim sovereign immunity from allegations the bank funded Hezbollah would have negative implications on disputes involving foreign trade.

  • April 05, 2024

    Ex-Acting Homeland Security GC Joins Nixon Peabody In DC

    Nixon Peabody LLP has hired the former acting general counsel of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, who joins the firm after working with the agency for more than two decades and through four presidential administrations.

  • April 04, 2024

    Google Files RICO Suit Alleging Crypto, Investing App Scams

    Google hit a pair of China-based app developers with a racketeering lawsuit in New York federal court Thursday, claiming they defrauded more than 100,000 users with dozens of fake investment and cryptocurrency exchange apps placed on the Google Play store that bilked users out of their money.

  • April 04, 2024

    Caterpillar 'Talking Out Both Sides,' Judge Says

    A Delaware federal judge chastised Caterpillar Inc. ahead of trial in a series of orders mostly siding with claims from a defunct construction equipment supplier accusing the company of pressuring an online auctioneer to break an important contract with the would-be competitor.

  • April 04, 2024

    Steel Talks Absent From Start Of US-EU Trade Ministerial

    Conversations on the first day of the EU-U.S. Trade and Technology Council on Thursday focused on sustainability for both the planet and the transatlantic partnership, but noticeably skirted the pair's foundered effort to reshape the global steel market.

  • April 04, 2024

    Trade Court Pans Feds' Excuses, Orders Redo Of Steel Duty

    The U.S. Court of International Trade was unconvinced Wednesday that the U.S. Department of Commerce had corrected an old mistake when it raised a Korean company's steel countervailing duties, calling the purported mistake an excuse to break from old practices.

  • April 04, 2024

    Ex-CBP Agent Avoids Prison For Selling King Of Pop Signature

    A 75-year-old former border agent who pled guilty to selling a customs declaration form signed by late singer Michael Jackson ducked prison time Thursday when a federal judge in North Carolina instead sentenced him to a year of probation.

  • April 04, 2024

    Huawei Slated For 2026 Sanctions, IP Theft Trial

    A Brooklyn federal judge on Thursday set the trial of China's Huawei Technologies and affiliates for 2026, over prosecutors' claims that Huawei deceived banks and the U.S. government for years about its business dealings in sanctioned countries and conspired to steal intellectual property from U.S. companies.

  • April 04, 2024

    Mattress Co. Can Redo Conspiracy Suit After 10th Circ. Trip

    A Utah federal judge has rejected arguments from leading mattress manufacturers that a competitor is too late to amend an antitrust lawsuit alleging the spread of false information, saying a Tenth Circuit appeal prevented the competitor from updating its claims sooner.

  • April 04, 2024

    Judge Axes Experts In Chiquita MDL, With More On The Way

    A Florida federal judge presiding over a long-running multidistrict litigation against Chiquita Brands rejected expert witnesses offered by both Chiquita and plaintiffs who accuse the banana grower of financially supporting a defunct Colombian paramilitary group that allegedly killed their relatives.

  • April 04, 2024

    2nd Circ. Vacates Logistics Co.'s $1.8M Damaged Cargo Win

    A New York federal court erred by rejecting a Chubb unit's reimbursement bid for an over $1.8 million damaged drug shipment, the Second Circuit ruled Thursday, finding a genuine factual dispute on whether the logistics company in charge was a "contracting carrier" under an international treaty governing air shipments.

  • April 03, 2024

    2nd Circ. Told FIFA Bribery Convictions Rightly Nixed

    A former 21st Century Fox television executive and an Argentine sports marketing company told the Second Circuit that a lower court was right to toss their convictions related to the FIFA corruption scandal, contending that U.S. law does not reach foreign commercial bribery.

  • April 03, 2024

    China, Australia Make Deal To End Wine Duty Spat

    Australia has dropped its World Trade Organization case against China after Beijing agreed to end hefty tariffs on wine imports from Down Under, a notice circulated to the WTO's Dispute Settlement Body confirmed Wednesday.

  • April 03, 2024

    EU Probing Solar Project Under Foreign Subsidy Rules

    European enforcers launched a pair of investigations Wednesday to assess whether companies bidding on a solar project in Romania received an unfair advantage through foreign subsidies.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Spray Painting Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experiences as an abstract spray paint artist have made me a better litigator, demonstrating — in more ways than one — how fluidity and flexibility are necessary parts of a successful legal practice, says Erick Sandlin at Bracewell.

  • Takeaways From The 2023 DOJ Fraud Section Report

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    Attorneys at Wiley discuss notable trends from the U.S. Department of Justice's recently reported Fraud Section activity last year and highlight areas of enforcement to watch for in the future, including healthcare fraud and Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations.

  • How Policymakers Can Preserve The Promise Of Global Trade

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    Global trade faces increasing challenges but could experience a resurgence if long-held approaches adjust and the U.S. accounts for factors that undermine free trade's continuing viability, such as regional trading blocs and the increasing speed of technological advancement, says David Jividen at White & Case.

  • New Russia Sanctions Reveal Int'l Enforcement Capabilities

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    Significant new U.K., U.S. and EU sanctions imposed on Russia notably target Europe-based individuals and entities accused of sanctions evasion, and with an apparent political will to enhance capabilities, the rhetoric is translating into international enforcement activity, say lawyers at Cadwalader.

  • Why Oncology Deal Making Continues To Fuel Biotech M&A

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    The biotech sector's potential for advancements in cancer care continues to attract deal-maker interest, and the keys to successful mergers and acquisitions include the ability to integrate innovative therapies, leverage technological advancements and respond to the dynamic needs of patients, say Bryan Luchs and Mike Weir at White & Case.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Is Imperative This Election Year

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    As the next election nears, the judges involved in the upcoming trials against former President Donald Trump increasingly face political pressures and threats of violence — revealing the urgent need to safeguard judicial independence and uphold the rule of law, says Benes Aldana at the National Judicial College.

  • How Harsher Penalties For AI Crimes May Work In Practice

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    With recent pronouncements from the U.S. Department of Justice that prosecutors may seek sentencing enhancements for crimes committed using artificial intelligence, defense counsel should understand how the sentencing guidelines and statutory factors will come into play, says Jennie VonCannon at Crowell & Moring.

  • Series

    Riding My Peloton Bike Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Using the Peloton platform for cycling, running, rowing and more taught me that fostering a mind-body connection will not only benefit you physically and emotionally, but also inspire stamina, focus, discipline and empathy in your legal career, says Christopher Ward at Polsinelli.

  • Compliance Steps After ABA White Collar Crime Conference

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    Senior law enforcement officials’ statements this month at the American Bar Association's white collar crime conference suggest government enforcement efforts this year will increasingly focus on whistleblower incentives, artificial intelligence and data protection, and companies will need to update their compliance programs accordingly, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • Investment Advisers Should Prep For Money Laundering Regs

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    Investment advisers should prepare for a Financial Crimes Enforcement Network proposed rule that would significantly expand anti-money laundering and counter-financing of terrorism obligations by assessing illicit financing risks, and expect examiners to scrutinize unregistered advisers and those with certain foreign clients, say attorneys at Paul Weiss.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • EU Inquiry Offers First Insight Into Foreign Subsidy Law

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    The European Commission's first in-depth investigation under the Foreign Subsidies Regulation into a public procurement process, and subsequent brief on regulatory trends, sheds light on the commission's approach to such cases, as well as jurisdictional, procedural and substantive issues under the regulation, says Matthew Hall at McGuireWoods.

  • What 2 Years Of Ukraine-Russia Conflict Can Teach Cos.

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    A few key legal lessons for the global business community since Russia's invasion of Ukraine could help protect global commerce in times of future conflict, including how to respond to disparate trade restrictions and sanctions, navigate war-related contract disputes, and protect against heightened cybersecurity risks, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Takeaways From Groundbreaking Data Transfer Order

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    A recent first-of-its-kind executive order and related proposed rulemaking lay the groundwork for important outbound U.S. data protections, but they may have unintended consequences related to the types of data and the subjects within their scope, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • FARA Enforcement May Soon Be In The Halls Of Higher Ed

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    Given Congress’ increased attention to rising foreign influence on U.S. college campuses, the U.S. Department of Justice may soon turn the Foreign Agents Registration Act spotlight on educational institutions and groups, which will need to review their possible obligations under the statute, says Tessa Capeloto at Wiley.

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