International Trade

  • April 10, 2024

    Merchant & Gould Adds IP Team From Oblon McClelland In DC

    Merchant & Gould has expanded its intellectual property services in Washington, D.C., with the recent addition of a five-person team of attorneys who moved their practices from Oblon McClelland Maier & Neustadt LLP.

  • April 10, 2024

    Feds Back Trial Delay For Sen. Menendez's Wife's Surgery

    Prosecutors on Wednesday told the New York federal judge overseeing Sen. Robert Menendez's bribery case that they are in favor of postponing the May trial for a few months in light of a serious medical condition affecting Nadine Menendez, the senator's wife and co-defendant.

  • April 10, 2024

    Trade Court Rules CBP Should've Labeled Planners As Diaries

    The U.S. Court of International Trade on Wednesday ruled that U.S. Customs and Border Protection improperly classified imports of a California calendar company's weekly-plus-monthly planners as notebooks, saying the products are diaries because they have spaces meant for jotting down reminders.

  • April 09, 2024

    US, UK And Australia Eye Japan For 'Advanced Capabilities'

    Japan may join Australia, the U.K. and the U.S. in the trio's efforts to develop advanced military capabilities and technology sharing in areas including artificial intelligence and quantum technologies, the three AUKUS security partners announced.

  • April 09, 2024

    Contractor Says Corruption Claims In $47M Army Fight Are False

    An Afghanistan-based fuel supplier seeking $47.2 million after the U.S. Army terminated two contracts has urged the Court of Federal Claims to reject government allegations that the company was involved in a corruption scheme, saying those arguments were inaccurate and irrelevant.

  • April 09, 2024

    Poland Adopts Digital Platform Reporting Rules

    Poland's Council of Ministers approved a measure Tuesday implementing the European Union's tax information reporting procedures for digital platform operators, known as DAC7, the country's tax authority said.

  • April 09, 2024

    Jury Must Hear Terrorism Payments Were Extortion, Chiquita Says

    Banana company Chiquita argued Tuesday it should not be blocked from presenting evidence about threats made to its employees by a Colombian paramilitary group and about other businesses making payments to the group at a coming bellwether trial in a long-running multidistrict litigation accusing Chiquita of funding the paramilitary group that allegedly killed the plaintiffs' relatives.

  • April 09, 2024

    Treasury Renews Call For Tools To Combat Crypto Crime

    Deputy Treasury Secretary Wally Adeyemo on Tuesday renewed his call to Congress for additional tools to combat cryptocurrency's use by bad actors as lawmakers floated their own priorities for a cryptocurrency regulatory regime.

  • April 09, 2024

    Sen. Menendez's Wife Says Surgery Should Delay Bribery Trial

    The wife of U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez said Tuesday that a "serious medical condition" requiring surgery should delay her trial on bribery charges, a case a New York federal judge has firmly set for May 6.

  • April 09, 2024

    Fragrance Giants Want Out Of 'Threadbare' Price-Fixing Suit

    Four international fragrance giants urged a New Jersey federal court to toss a proposed class action accusing them of conspiring to reduce competition in the multibillion-dollar fragrance market, saying plaintiffs are struggling to point to any price-fixing agreement.

  • April 09, 2024

    Trade Court OKs Revoking Plywood Duty Evasion Ruling

    The U.S. Court of International Trade accepted U.S. Customs and Border Protection's rescission of a duty evasion ruling that exposed importers to duties on Chinese plywood, but let CBP handle the question of duties paid under the now-rescinded ruling.

  • April 08, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Won't Touch ITC's Sonos Ruling

    Neither Google nor its legal foe at speaker brand Sonos was able to persuade the Federal Circuit on Monday to change a mixed holding from the U.S. International Trade Commission that allowed some redesigned Google Home products to stay on the market.

  • April 08, 2024

    FTC's Slaughter Defends International Cooperation

    Several federal agency leaders said Monday they are working across the government to help boost competition, as Federal Trade Commissioner Rebecca Kelly Slaughter touted the importance of cooperation on competition issues at home and abroad.

  • April 08, 2024

    US Pledges $6.6B To TSMC As Chip Co. Eyes 3rd Ariz. Plant

    The Biden administration on Monday proposed a pledge of $6.6 billion to Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. in hopes of boosting the U.S. domestic semiconductor industry as the chipmaking giant eyes a third fabrication plant in Arizona.

  • April 08, 2024

    Wiley Hires US Trade Rep GC To Int'l Trade Group

    Wiley Rein LLP has hired the former general counsel to the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, who joins its international trade practice as a partner, the firm announced Monday.

  • April 08, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Upholds Toss Of Chinese Wheels Duties Fight

    The Federal Circuit on Monday backed the U.S. Court of International Trade's dismissal of a wheel importer's lawsuit challenging duties on its Chinese-origin steel wheels, saying the CIT could have heard the case had the importer sought administrative review on the duties.

  • April 08, 2024

    Greek Air Force Says $22M Contract Dispute Was Timely

    Greece's Air Force has urged the Federal Circuit to revive its $21.7 million suit over faulty cameras purchased from a U.S. contractor, saying its claim accumulated later than the U.S. government had argued and was timely.

  • April 08, 2024

    Menendez Seeks To Block Info On Lifestyle, Political Donors

    U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez is seeking to have evidence about his and his wife's lifestyle and spending habits and information about his campaign donors excluded from the bribery trial that the couple and two business associates are facing on May 6, according to court documents.

  • April 08, 2024

    EU Tax Single Filing Would Aid Small-Biz Trade, Official Says

    A proposal allowing small businesses in the European Union to file a single tax return with the administration of the business' head office as opposed to with every member country where the entity does business would cut compliance costs and encourage trade, an EU official said.

  • April 05, 2024

    Baltimore Bridge: Biden's Visit, Recovery, Supply Chain

    Nearly two weeks after the Francis Scott Key Bridge's collapse, government and legal maneuvers are taking shape as the Biden administration pledged to fully reopen the Port of Baltimore before June, while the owner and operator of the ship that caused the collapse sought to limit its financial liability.

  • April 05, 2024

    Trade Court Backs Commerce's Dates For Turkish Rebar Sales

    The U.S. Court of International Trade rebuffed Turkish rebar producers seeking to unwind tariffs on their products based on the U.S. Department of Commerce's designated date of sale for their U.S. imports, holding that evidence backed the agency.

  • April 05, 2024

    Judge Lourie's Dissent Revives Debate Over FDA Safe Harbor

    U.S. Circuit Judge Alan Lourie has urged the Federal Circuit to reconsider its precedent over a safe harbor that allows infringement when companies are developing products regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and many attorneys agreed with him that the appeals court has been improperly expanding the safe harbor for decades.

  • April 05, 2024

    Judge Newman Pushes To Keep Suit Over Suspension Intact

    U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman urged a D.C. federal judge Friday to let her pursue a constitutional challenge to the law under which she has been suspended, and to reject her colleagues' contention that her case does not pass legal muster.

  • April 05, 2024

    Gunmakers Denied Stay In Mexico Lawsuit

    Gunmakers hoping to get the U.S. Supreme Court to take up their effort to end a lawsuit by the Mexican government seeking to hold them liable for arming drug cartels can't make an end run around the First Circuit to pause the case while they wait, a Massachusetts district judge said on Friday.

  • April 05, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Upholds Australian Steel Import Pricing

    A Federal Circuit panel has backed the U.S. Department of Commerce and a trade court's assessment of the prices an Australian steel company charged its U.S. customer, holding that the companies provided enough of a paper trail to explain their relationship.

Expert Analysis

  • EU Inquiry Offers First Insight Into Foreign Subsidy Law

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    The European Commission's first in-depth investigation under the Foreign Subsidies Regulation into a public procurement process, and subsequent brief on regulatory trends, sheds light on the commission's approach to such cases, as well as jurisdictional, procedural and substantive issues under the regulation, says Matthew Hall at McGuireWoods.

  • What 2 Years Of Ukraine-Russia Conflict Can Teach Cos.

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    A few key legal lessons for the global business community since Russia's invasion of Ukraine could help protect global commerce in times of future conflict, including how to respond to disparate trade restrictions and sanctions, navigate war-related contract disputes, and protect against heightened cybersecurity risks, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Takeaways From Groundbreaking Data Transfer Order

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    A recent first-of-its-kind executive order and related proposed rulemaking lay the groundwork for important outbound U.S. data protections, but they may have unintended consequences related to the types of data and the subjects within their scope, say attorneys at Kirkland.

  • FARA Enforcement May Soon Be In The Halls Of Higher Ed

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    Given Congress’ increased attention to rising foreign influence on U.S. college campuses, the U.S. Department of Justice may soon turn the Foreign Agents Registration Act spotlight on educational institutions and groups, which will need to review their possible obligations under the statute, says Tessa Capeloto at Wiley.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

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    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Opinion

    European Union Criticisms Of The FCPA Are Misguided

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    Some in the European Union have criticized U.S. enforcement of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act for what they perceive as jurisdictional overreach, but this appears to overlook the crucial fact that jurisdiction is voluntary, and critics should focus instead on the lack of equivalent laws in their own region, say John Joy and YuTong Wang at FTI Law.

  • Business Litigators Have A Source Of Untapped Fulfillment

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    As increasing numbers of attorneys struggle with stress and mental health issues, business litigators can find protection against burnout by remembering their important role in society — because fulfillment in one’s work isn’t just reserved for public interest lawyers, say Bennett Rawicki and Peter Bigelow at Hilgers Graben.

  • Series

    Skiing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    A lifetime of skiing has helped me develop important professional skills, and taught me that embracing challenges with a spirit of adventure can allow lawyers to push boundaries, expand their capabilities and ultimately excel in their careers, says Andrea Przybysz at Tucker Ellis.

  • The Good, The Bad And The New Of The UK Sanctions Regime

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    Almost six years after the Sanctions and Money Laundering Act was introduced, the U.K. government has published a strategy paper that outlines its focus points and unveils potential changes to the regime, such as a new humanitarian exception for financial sanctions, highlighting the rapid transformation of the U.K. sanctions landscape, says Josef Rybacki at WilmerHale.

  • The Road Ahead For Florida's Drug Importation Program

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    Though the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Florida's drug importation program in January, a series of hurdles — including requisite buy-in from Canada — and potential legal challenges must be addressed before importation can begin, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Practical Steps For Navigating New Sanctions On Russia

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    After the latest round of U.S. sanctions against Russia – the largest to date since the Ukraine war began – companies will need to continue to strengthen due diligence and compliance measures to navigate the related complexities, say James Min and Chelsea Ellis at Rimon.

  • Assessing Chinese Cross-Border Data Transfers

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    Jet Deng and Ken Dai at Dacheng unpack the regulatory framework for cross-border data transfers in China, detailing the major systems at play, last year's policy adjustments, and an outlook and practice tips for businesses.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Forget Everything You Know About IRAC

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    The mode of legal reasoning most students learn in law school, often called “Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion,” or IRAC, erroneously frames analysis as a separate, discrete step, resulting in disorganized briefs and untold obfuscation — but the fix is pretty simple, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • Opinion

    OFAC Should Loosen Restrictions On Arbitration Services

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    The Office of Foreign Assets Control regulations should be amended so that U.S. persons can provide arbitration services to sanctioned parties — this would help align OFAC policy with broader U.S. arbitration policy, promote efficiency, and effectively address related geopolitical and regulatory challenges, says Javier Coronado Diaz at Diaz Reus.

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